The Journey to a Healthy Gut

The Journey to a Healthy Gut

Gut health is vital and there are many easy ways to acquire a healthy gut. For this article, we’ll look at the importance of gut health and an easy way to begin the journey of obtaining a healthy gut.

Why is our gut health important?
Our gut microbiome is literally where most of our immune system exists. It’s also where most of your feel good chemicals are produced. If you don’t have a healthy gut, there are several problems which can arise.

These tissues ought to be treated with care in order to rev up those molecules of our most important bodily systems. 

What is a simple way to begin the journey to a healthy gut?
Most of our lives we’re told to remain healthy. There’s a simple way to do that as we watch the categories of food we tend to place into our bodies. Just because it’s health food, it doesn’t all have to be tasteless and gross.

The old saying goes, the livelier colors of your food, the livelier your gut flora are going to be. Therefore let’s spice those meals or snacks up a touch to achieve advantages they have to give.

 

What foods am I able to eat for a healthier gut?

The trail from plate to mouth ought to be filled with colors and flavor. What are a number of those tasteful foods to eat?

1. Low FODMAP Foods – There are numerous varieties to decide on, however low FODMAP foods will do wonders for every kind of uncomfortable symptoms one has.

2. Fermented vegetables and Kefir – This is often one among the most effective ways that push billions of live, friendly microorganism into your gut and it’s less expensive than shopping for probiotics.

3. Bananas – These yellow beauties restore health to the microorganism community living inside your gut. Contain high levels of atomic number 19, or potassium, and magnesium that is thought to cut back inflammation.

4. Dilleniid dicot family vegetables – These embrace broccoli, kale, cabbage, and cauliflower. They help to alleviate inflammation and have disease-fighting elements.

5. Blueberries – they will modify the microbiota to reinforce the system in addition to increasing memory. And they’re low-glycemic.

6. 70%+ Dark Chocolate – amazingly bittersweet chocolate or Theobroma cacao may be a plant that’s a glorious prebiotic which suggests it feeds the friendly microorganism, and successively creates a lot of healthy microflora.

 

Resistant Starches

Most of the research today has shown that the best way to keep the gut microbiome healthy is feeding and keeping alive the native species of bacteria and yeast already present in your body, rather than just taking probiotics. 

To do this, you can eat resistant starches such as chicory root or potato starch. Wild yams are also a great way to get resistant starches into your diet. 

Keeping the gut microbiome happy is ultimately one of the best investments you can make for your overall health as so many health conditions have their origin within the gut. 

 

Types of IBS

Types of IBS

IBS diet restore 3Learn about the various types of irritable bowel syndrome.

People with irritable bowel syndrome or IBS suffer from recurrent gas, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea and food intolerance. The severity of IBS and symptoms may vary from person to person. However, the symptoms of IBS tend to recur and go on for months.

There are three different types of irritable bowel syndrome, and all of them can cause a great deal of misery for the IBS sufferer.

IBS With Diarrhea (IBS-D)

Irritable bowel syndrome that causes frequent diarrhea is called IBS-D. With IBS-D, you might have loose stools frequently — but not always. People with IBS-D also have sudden, intense urges to go to the bathroom.

The most common symptoms of IBS-D include:

  • Frequent or loose stools
  • Sudden urges to have bowel movements
  • Abdominal discomfort or pain
  • Gas
  • Nausea
  • Feeling like the bowels can’t be emptied completely

IBS with constipation (IBS-C)

One of the defining features of this type of IBS is constipation. IBS-C is more than just chronic constipation. It involves other symptoms, including diarrhea. This type of IBS is especially harmful to the intestines. Having constant constipation can weaken the walls of the intestines causing spasms. Other symptoms of IBS-C include: :

  • Lumpy stools
  • Hard stools
  • Cramps or pain in the stomach area
  • Straining to have a bowel movement
  • Having a bowel movement less than three times a week

IBS With Alternating Constipation And Diarrhea (IBS-A)

Most people get diarrhea or constipation from time to time. However, if you get both of them often, you might have a type of IBS known as IBS A for alternating or irritable bowel syndrome with alternating diarrhea and constipation. Several research studies have found that people with IBS-A tend to get more stomach cramping and pain than with those who have other types of IBS.

Symptoms of IBS-A include:

  • Alternating diarrhea and constipation
  • Stomach pain and cramping

What causes IBS?

Researchers do not know what causes irritable bowel syndrome. Women are more likely to have IBS than men. It is also more common in people under the age of 50. People who have a family member with IBS are more likely to get the disorder.

How is IBS Diagnosed?

There isn’t a specific test that can say whether you have IBS or not. Your doctor will likely look at your health history and symptoms to determine whether or not you have IBS. Your physician may conduct other tests to rule out other similar conditions. If the tests do not point towards another disorder, your doctor may diagnose IBS.

What are the treatments for IBS?

SIBO restore 3You might need to try several different things to get relief from IBS. Changing your diet can help.

One of the prime underlying causes of IBS is often an imbalance in the gut. The Restore 3 program can help you treat IBS and restore your digestive system to a healthy state. It disrupts and remove harmful bacteria in the gut and replenishes your digestive system with healthy microbiome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

https://www.webmd.com/ibs/default.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Surprising Link Between Irritable Bowel Syndrome And Anxiety And Depression

The Surprising Link Between Irritable Bowel Syndrome And Anxiety And Depression

IBS diet restore 3It is common for people who have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) to also suffer from anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Doctors aren’t sure on how irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric symptoms are related. But the one thing that is clear is that the diseases often occur together.

According to research studies, anywhere from 50 to 90 percent of people diagnosed with IBS to also have psychiatric disorders.1 The most common disorders seen in patients with irritable bowel syndrome are anxiety-related conditions and depression.

Medical experts have several theories about the connection between irritable bowel syndrome and depression and anxiety. Scientists from the Mayo Clinic suggest that a common genetic link between IBS and mental illness may be present in some people.2 The researchers believe that there is a common gene that can manifest itself as mental illness or IBS.

Another Theory

Another theory is that people with anxiety might be more aware of spasms in the colon that are associated with IBS.3   

Irritable bowel syndrome is often triggered by the immune system. Stress has been found to affect the immune system significantly. So, some medical specialists believe that people who are under a lot of pressure or anxiety might be apt to develop IBS symptoms because of the stress/immune system link.4   

There might also be a standard connection between IBS, depression and gut microbiota. Healthy gut microbiota is essential to health. It plays a significant role in a robust immune system and communication between the stomach and the brain.5   

SIBO restore 3A disruption of the healthy gut microbiota is frequently seen in people with IBS. People with IBS tend to have gut microbes that are more unstable and less diverse than healthy people. Researchers have also found that people with psychological symptoms often have alterations in healthy gut microbiota. In fact, scientists believe that the gut microbiota could be the missing link in depression.6   

Scientists believe that gut microbiota could initiate or contribute to the persistence of mental health symptoms.

Treating Both

While there has not been a specific cause of the IBS/mental health link, treating the IBS might help relieve symptoms of depression or anxiety, as well. One study, published in the Journal of Gastroenterology found that taking a probiotic supplement can relieve both conditions.

For the study, scientists recruited 44 adults with irritable bowel syndrome who also experienced mild or moderate depression or anxiety. Half of the subjects took a placebo, and half received a probiotic. Sixty-four percent of the participants who took the IBS probiotic were found to have decreased depression scores. Only 32 percent of the control group had improvements in depression. Participants that received the probiotic also had decreases and IBS symptoms as well.7   

It is evident based on the research that establishing a healthy ratio of gut microbiome can reduce the symptoms of IBS and it might help relieve some symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well.

Supplements like the Restore 3 program that help relieve IBS symptoms might also have a positive benefit on mental health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12108820
  2. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041108020023.htm
  3. https://www.webmd.com/ibs/guide/stress-anxiety-ibs#1
  4. https://www.webmd.com/ibs/guide/stress-anxiety-ibs#1
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662178/
  6. http://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/en/toward-better-understanding-link-irritable-bowel-syndrome-anxiety-depression/
  7. http://time.com/4801842/probiotics-mood-depression-ibs/

 

 

 

 

The IBS Diet

The IBS Diet

IBS diet restore 3Do you suffer from the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)? Is diarrhea, cramping, bloating and gas causing you a great deal of misery? If you have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), you might suffer from these symptoms on a daily basis. Irritable bowel syndrome symptoms can cause a great deal of anxiety; the good news is that the proper diet can help significantly when it comes to controlling the symptoms of IBS.

The gut harbors trillions of fungi and bacterial cells naturally. Usually, there is a balance of healthy bacteria in the stomach, which helps to keep unhealthy microbes under control. However, certain foods can contribute to an imbalance of microbes in the gut. This can result in an overgrowth of harmful bacteria in the digestive system, which can lead to symptoms of IBS.

So, the first step in eliminating IBS symptoms is to change the environment of the gut. The gut environment is what has caused an imbalance in the first place. So, you must restore the stomach to its healthy state. One way to help that process along is by following an IBS diet. An IBS diet will help nourish your body by starving off unhealthy bacteria in the gut.

Foods to Avoid

You can start to balance your gut microbiota by starving off and flushing out harmful bacteria that reside in the gut. To do this, you’ll want to avoid certain foods that are hard for your body to digest. You don’t need to avoid these foods forever — just until your gut has established an equilibrium. After your digestive system is balanced, then you can start introducing these foods back into your diet. Here are the foods to initially avoid:

  • Starches – All grains and starches, including those deemed to be gluten-free, should be avoided at first.
  • Sugars -Stay away from sugars, including fruit juices initially.  
  • Dairy – Homemade kefir is okay. Otherwise, avoid dairy products.
  • FODMAP foods – These foods contain certain carbs that can cause digestive issues. Examples include wheat, onion, garlic, asparagus, brussel sprouts.
  • GMO foods – Stay away from genetically modified foods, such as aspartame and soy.   
  • Nightshade fruits and vegetables – These foods belong to the family of Solanaceae plants. Examples include bell peppers, tomatoes and eggplants.

For the complete list of foods to avoid, check out our helpful ebook.

Foods To Eat

low fodmap diet restore 3So, what foods can you eat then? You’ll want to eat clean, organic meats and vegetables like organic chicken, eggs and low FODMAP foods. These are easier for the body to digest and will help eliminate pathogens while keeping your nourished. Here are some other things to do:

  • Drink plenty of water – Water helps flush out the toxins from your body.
  • Try activated charcoal – This can help your body flush out toxins, as well.

Restore

After you have flushed out your gut, you’ll want to work on restoring your gut microbiome. In this stage, you will optimize your body with the proper nutrients. A restorative diet will help you do just that.

We have developed a meal plan that includes daily examples of meals to help restore your body to its natural state. For examples of meals and a handy shopping list to go along with it, checkout the Restore 3 Program ebook here. It has everything that you need to follow an IBS diet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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