Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms

IBS restore 3Do you ever have extreme stomach pain? Feel like there are days when you can’t get off the toilet? Maybe you feel so exhausted from the constant pain and bloating that you’re exhausted at the end of the day.  If so, then you could have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common gastrointestinal disorder worldwide —affecting up to 15% of people. IBS is more common in people under the age of 45. IBS is a long-term, chronic condition but there are effective treatments to help you manage it.

Common Symptoms

So, what are the irritable bowel syndrome symptoms? Some of the most common irritable bowel syndrome symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea – Up to one-third of patients with IBS experience frequent diarrhea.
  • Stomach pain and cramping – Abdominal pain is a common irritable bowel syndrome symptom. The pain will usually decrease following a bowel movement.
  • Gas and bloating – This can be severe and persistent.
  • Food intolerances – The majority of people with IBS report food intolerances, especially to foods containing lactose and gluten.
  • Insomnia and other sleep problems – A lot of people with IBS have difficulty sleeping likely because the symptoms tend to interfere with sleep.
  • Persistent fatigue – Insomnia can cause you to feel tired continuously throughout the day. This fatigue can make it hard to get through the day.
  • Depression and anxiety – Studies show that about 60 percent of IBS patients have depression, anxiety or another psychiatric disorder. It is not clear why these issues occur with IBS, but medical experts have several theories. They think that stress affects the immune system, which can trigger IBS. Another argument is that stress may make the mind more aware of IBS symptoms. Depression is thought to be triggered or worsened by IBS. Physical ailments often trigger depression.

What Can I Do If I Have Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms?  

IBS journalIf you had symptoms of IBS, the first thing that you should do is visit your doctor. Before your appointment, it might be helpful to keep an IBS symptoms journal. This record can help your doctor diagnose irritable bowel syndrome. It can also help your doctor identify your triggers.

Your doctor might want to test to make sure that your irritable bowel syndrome symptoms are not due to another illness. They’ll also likely talk to you about ways to control your irritable bowel syndrome symptoms.

Living With and Managing IBS Symptoms

Although there is not a cure for IBS, there are some lifestyle changes that you can make to help you manage the illness.

Try Acupuncture

acupuncture restore 3Acupuncture has been proven effective for treating chronic pain. Acupuncture is a popular therapy for IBS, and many patients get relief with acupuncture. Several studies have shown that it can help with abdominal bloating and other irritable bowel syndrome symptoms.

Take Supplements for IBS

WebMD recommends supplements for irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Supplements like the Restore 3 program for IBS can help restore the proper balance of bacteria in the digestive system. This restoration helps combat the symptoms of IBS so that you feel better.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Surprising Link Between Irritable Bowel Syndrome And Anxiety And Depression

The Surprising Link Between Irritable Bowel Syndrome And Anxiety And Depression

IBS diet restore 3It is common for people who have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) to also suffer from anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Doctors aren’t sure on how irritable bowel syndrome and psychiatric symptoms are related. But the one thing that is clear is that the diseases often occur together.

According to research studies, anywhere from 50 to 90 percent of people diagnosed with IBS to also have psychiatric disorders.1 The most common disorders seen in patients with irritable bowel syndrome are anxiety-related conditions and depression.

Medical experts have several theories about the connection between irritable bowel syndrome and depression and anxiety. Scientists from the Mayo Clinic suggest that a common genetic link between IBS and mental illness may be present in some people.2 The researchers believe that there is a common gene that can manifest itself as mental illness or IBS.

Another Theory

Another theory is that people with anxiety might be more aware of spasms in the colon that are associated with IBS.3   

Irritable bowel syndrome is often triggered by the immune system. Stress has been found to affect the immune system significantly. So, some medical specialists believe that people who are under a lot of pressure or anxiety might be apt to develop IBS symptoms because of the stress/immune system link.4   

There might also be a standard connection between IBS, depression and gut microbiota. Healthy gut microbiota is essential to health. It plays a significant role in a robust immune system and communication between the stomach and the brain.5   

SIBO restore 3A disruption of the healthy gut microbiota is frequently seen in people with IBS. People with IBS tend to have gut microbes that are more unstable and less diverse than healthy people. Researchers have also found that people with psychological symptoms often have alterations in healthy gut microbiota. In fact, scientists believe that the gut microbiota could be the missing link in depression.6   

Scientists believe that gut microbiota could initiate or contribute to the persistence of mental health symptoms.

Treating Both

While there has not been a specific cause of the IBS/mental health link, treating the IBS might help relieve symptoms of depression or anxiety, as well. One study, published in the Journal of Gastroenterology found that taking a probiotic supplement can relieve both conditions.

For the study, scientists recruited 44 adults with irritable bowel syndrome who also experienced mild or moderate depression or anxiety. Half of the subjects took a placebo, and half received a probiotic. Sixty-four percent of the participants who took the IBS probiotic were found to have decreased depression scores. Only 32 percent of the control group had improvements in depression. Participants that received the probiotic also had decreases and IBS symptoms as well.7   

It is evident based on the research that establishing a healthy ratio of gut microbiome can reduce the symptoms of IBS and it might help relieve some symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well.

Supplements like the Restore 3 program that help relieve IBS symptoms might also have a positive benefit on mental health.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References:

 

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12108820
  2. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/11/041108020023.htm
  3. https://www.webmd.com/ibs/guide/stress-anxiety-ibs#1
  4. https://www.webmd.com/ibs/guide/stress-anxiety-ibs#1
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4662178/
  6. http://www.gutmicrobiotaforhealth.com/en/toward-better-understanding-link-irritable-bowel-syndrome-anxiety-depression/
  7. http://time.com/4801842/probiotics-mood-depression-ibs/

 

 

 

 

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